Day 3- #MindfulnessForChildrenChallenge

When a person is in crisis (stressed, anxious, mad, upset, etc), they tend to tense up their muscles. This is especially true with children.

Progressive muscle relaxation helps a person to relax and become more calm and in control. Research reveals that there is a reduction in the levels of cortisol, a hormone released in response to stress when this strategy is employed.

Today, we will begin developing this strategy through a simple Squish and Relax routine.

Squish and Relax

– Have your child sit comfortably with a soft, squishy object. It can be a ball of play dough, a small stress ball, a small stuffed anima, etc. They are to hold this in their hands.

– Ask them to take a deep breath.

– Direct them to become aware of their body and instruct them to slowly move their awareness to the dough, noticing the sensations from their arms and hands.

– Tell them to squeeze tightly like they are trying to pick up a heavy weight. Have them hold this pose for a count of five, then relax.

– Repeat this cycle over a period of a minute.

– Repeat with other hand.

– Afterwards, discuss with the children how their bodies felt during and after the activity. What did they notice? How could this help them when they are angry, upset or anxious?

Don’t forget to share your child’s mindfulmoment and successes by using the hashtag #MindfulnessForChildrenChallenge in the comments, on Twitter @Ed_Tmprince or on Facebook at Education’s Voice – Mindfulness ( https://www.facebook.com/educationsvoice/ ).

Day 2 #MindfulnessForChildrenChallenge

For many people, the events happening around us can be scary. When people are highly anxious, the reptilian brain snaps into action and feelings of survival and negativity surface. Negativity does not help mental health and we have to make a conscious decision to be tankful for what we do have.

Gratitude (being thankful) is a fundamental component of mindfulness. Teaching children (and adults) to be thankful for the the abundance in their lives as opposed to focusing on the actual material objects is not always readily accepted in our society.

By taking the time to be grateful and lingering in the grateful moment, we start to be mindful of the good things in the world. We start to see more positive things; positivity breeds positivity. We start to see the good in people, we crave it and, when we see it, we want to repeat even more good.

Today’s challenge is to encourage thought around the good things happening in our lives and enjoying those precious moments of gratitude withe the Fab Five activity.

Fab Five

You will need:

– paper

– markers, pencil colours or crayons

How to:

1- Take some time to discuss what fabulous things they have in their lives and are thankful for having. Don’t allow your child to only focus on material things. Encourage non tangible things as well such as love from an individual, time spent with an individual or special friendships. Discuss why they are thankful for those things.

2- Have your child place their hand on the paper with their fingers spread and trace around their hands.

3- Then, in each finger, have them write and/or draw one thing they are thankful for having in their lives. In the end they will have five fabulous things that they are thankful for having.

4- In the palm, have them either draw something that represents their personality or write their name.

5- Place the completed drawing somewhere they can see often. Encourage them to look at it often during the day as a reminder to be thankful.

Don’t forget to share your child’s mindfulmoment and successes by using the hashtag #MindfulnessForChildrenChallenge in the comments, on Twitter @Ed_Tmprince or on Facebook at Education’s Voice – Mindfulness ( https://www.facebook.com/educationsvoice/ ).

Day 1 #MindfulnessForChildrenChallenge

What could be more natural than breathing?

It is an automatic reflex that is hard wired in our brains. It changes energy from tension to relaxation. It does this by turning off our sympathetic nervous system that produces stress hormones. This then turns on our parasympathetic nervous system, which turns off the stress hormone pump.

Deep breathing relaxes the body, decreases the heart rates lowers the blood pressure and creates the feeling of calmness. In addition, the deep breathing ensures the essential extra oxygen the brain needs for optimal function.

It all sounds very technical however, to a child it can feel magical!

Teaching children fun and active breathing exercises will help them control their emotions and calm themselves down in situations that make them extremely happy and hyper and in situations that make them very mad and upset. Also, daily breathing sessions, even when calm, increases a person’s feeling of well being and control. 

Here is a favourite fun breathing exercise for children to try today.

Snake Breathing

When snakes are coiled and resting, they look around calmly, and when they move, they are slow and smooth.


– Have your child sit up tall.

– Take a deep breath in, filling up their whole body.

– Pause

– Breathe out slowly and smoothly, making a hissing sound for as loud as they can. (Note: The key to deep breathing is to exhale longer than you inhale. The hissing controls the extension of the exhale.)

– Repeat for three to five rounds, letting them slow down and become calmer each time.

– Afterwards, discuss with them about how their body is feeling and what they are noticing following the breathing exercise. 

Many children enjoy being told the science of breathing and understanding why this does help them calm down.

Repeat at least five times today while calm. You are wanting to create a habit. Then, at any point you see them getting angry, upset, or overly excited try getting them to use the snake breath.

Don’t forget to share your child’s mindful moment using the hashtag, #MindfulnessForChildrenChallenge and successes in the comments below, on Twitter @Ed_Tmprince or on Facebook at Education’s Voice – Mindfulness ( https://www.facebook.com/educationsvoice/ ).

#MindfulnessForChildrenChallenge

It has been a strange few weeks and each day it seems to become stranger. Everyone is worried about the Covid-19 pandemic and many of you are in isolation with your children. It can be hard on the children because much of what they know as familiar has been removed from their schedule and Home Learning has become the new norm for a while. Add the anxiety adults are feeling and it can make for difficult days.

Starting on Sunday, 29th March 2020, I will be posting a #MindfulnessForChildrenChallenge for 30 days. They will be simple, low cost/no cost strategies to try with your children to help them find peace at this stressful time.

Let me know if you are joining in via the comments below, via Facebook page ( https://www.facebook.com/educationsvoice/ ) or on Twitter @Ed_Tmprince. Then each day of the challenge, let us know how your children are getting on with the challenges.

Start sharing this post! The more the merrier!

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑